Category Archives: WD Schock

Speed Breeds Brilliance!

Adjusting your lowers, to point higher, to sail faster, and run deeper!

Tune talk:

This past weekend in the light conditions of the Lorin Weiss regatta; we were sailing Patches with a loose rig and lots of jibstay sag. We had no tension on the lowers, we had them set so when sailing upwind with the sails trimmed and sighting up the mast we had about a 1/2 column of sag at the spreaders.

The goal was to induce Jibstay sag, so to power up the rig, to help us accelerate thru the lulls and to sail lower and faster when in a puff while sailing down wind.

The mast on a Harbor 20 is a fractional rig, the mainsheet tensions the leech of the main, which in turn pulls the mast tip back, at the same time the force of the jibstay is trying to pull the mast forward, one force is pulling back the other is pulling forward, one is at the top of the mast the other is several feet down, the only thing keeping the mast from bending are the lowers, so the lowers control how much the mast bends and how much power you can put into the rig. They also control how far forward your mast can go down wind.

Your mast is like a bow and arrow, what controls the bow are the lowers, the tighter the lowers are the straighter the mast, the firmer your bow, it takes more mainsheet, backstay and boom vang to bend the mast and induce jibstay sag, as you literally have to make the mast shorter to get what you need!

When the mast is locked on at the old mast tune number of 27/20 you were really limited with what you can do with controlling the mast and the camber of the sails.

Since we often sail from puff to puff, you want to set your boat up for the lulls, so you can be sailing as hi and as fast as possible at all times. You want your boat to accelerate quickly and to be able to change the shape and camber of your sails as you accelerate thru a puff.

Its like finding a few new gears in your boats transmission, would you rather ride a 15 speed bike or a single gear mountain bike with fat tires?

The lowers control jibstay sag as they make the mast firmer – the softer the mast is the more it moves in the boat, the more control you have over the amount of jibstay sag you can induce, the more you can control your sail plan with just the mainsheet.

Ease the main and the jib takes over pulling the mast forward, allowing the mast to straighten and the jibstay to sag. Tighten the main, the mast comes back, you reduce the amount of jibstay sag as the mast rocks back and begins to bend.

Jibstay sag gives you power, point and acceleration –

Who doesn’t want to point higher, sail faster and be able to drive lower in a puff down-wind?

We all do, we are all looking to sail better, smarter and faster. But like everything it takes practice, you have to react to the conditions and shift gears. What is fast on one tack may differ in the next or from tack to tack. What matters most is sailing fast, connecting from puff to puff and working to sail the fastest course from mark to mark. As in sailing, often the fastest course is not the shortest distance, as everything we do has to be managed by the wind, current and obstructions we sail by and thru.

Note: What you want in in terms of power and control in light air, is different at the upper end when you need your mast under control, the jibstay flat and your mast bent to flatten the main.

Here is a sample of how I sail from puff to puff.

First I start the day looking at the tide, current, race venue, course location and competition.

I then set up Patches to the conditions I expect. My base tune is 12 on the upper and 6 on the lowers. If its light I go off a full turn on the uppers and a ½ turn on the lowers.

If I think its going to be windy and puffy, I go up a turn, last week I learned that if its going to blow 15 to go up three turns on the uppers and three to four turn on the lowers to set my rig and jibstay sag.

Mast rake:
I believe you cant get enough rake on Harbor 20’s, so I set my rake by hoisting my measuring tape up the mast till it reads 28 feet when measured at the counsel and then going back to the transom; their your rake should measure 30’6” max to minimum of 30’4”. Mine is set at 30’4”.

I always double check to make sure my mast is in the middle of the boat, I do this by setting the main halyard so I can touch the combing and measure from side to side to get a feel that my mast is in the middle of the boat.

Now that my rig is set, I set my jib, I set it low enough on the jibstay so that I can max the outhaul in the biggest puff of the day, from their I sent the downhaul on the snug side of what I like, as I have learned with a small narrow jib works better draft forward with a flat exit, as I control the draft and camber with Jibstay sag.

Sailing upwind, fast is main eased, rig forward, 6-8 inches of jibstay sag, boat is powered up, as I heal, I trim the main harder and harder, this flattens the jib, makes the jibstay straight, main starts to flatten and I go into point mode.

Boat slows down, I lean on the jib, what I mean by this is that I bear off till the outside telltales are lifting, I east the main, power up the rig, get the jib to sag, as the jib sags I am able to sail in hi fast point mode with the tell tails lifting.

The goal is to be going as fast if not faster then the boats around, if I am slow, I work back thru the loop to be sailing faster. Its better to ease and sail fast then the luff, pinch and sail in bad air!

Tacking:
Most people under stack, they go from hi point to hi point mode, they, don’t east their mains in the tack and tack into the jibstay sag. You want to go from hi point mode to fast powered up mode, main eased, 6-8 inches of jibstay sag, outside telltales lifting, in full powered up mode.

Downwind:
The key here is to get the mast to move forward, to get use to sailing with a floppy jibstay. The goal is to get the jib out in front of the boat, to connect with the puffs and to sail low and fast. This takes practice, I have found that its really hard to trim the jib if it gets too far out in front of the boat, so the driver has to work with the jib trimmer, by working the backstay to keep the boat powered up.

There is nothing like connecting with a puff, having your rig forward, your jib powered and be sailing lower and faster then the boats around you.

It’s a lot of work, but when you master it there nothing like the feeling of speed, as indeed speed does bread brilliants

Best,

Walter Johnson
Patches H20 – 389

Fun at Hilton Head

 
Hilton Head Highlights

Hilton Head, South Carolina is the home of a growing Harbor 20 Fleet. SCYC is a hidden gem of activity. But with a boat like the Harbor 20, it’s no wonder these sailers spend so much time on the water!

1)  The Harbor 20 is the most actively sailed keelboat in the country. Harbor 20s have more races with more boats sailing  than any other keelboat.
2) Harbor 20s are also the most actively sailed boat at every single club that has a Harbor 20 fleet. Clubs that have Harbor 20s are vibrant.
3) The Harbor 20 has the highest percentage of women skippers of any sailboat in the world. Nearly 30% of race skippers of Harbor 20s are women.

 

4) The Harbor 20 has the biggest Corinthian turnout of any keelboat class champs in the country.  
5) The Harbor 20 also has the highest percentage of family teams of any class.  Fully 75% of the teams at the last class champs were families.

They have a busy calendar with plenty of activities in the up-coming season. Nothing will keep these fun-loving Harbor 20 skippers off the water. Even the cold weather hasn’t deterred sailors from enjoying Wednesday night racing year-round.They usually have about 8-10 Harbor20 boats come out every week to enjoy a little friendly competition, in the spirit of the Most Active Fleet.

Speaking of friendly competition, Hilton Head will be hosting the Windmill Harbour Regatta (also known as the Domenico De Sole or DDS Regatta) from Fri. April 24 – Sun April 26. All are welcome to sign up to participate in the races on the regatta website. This regatta is well organized and coordinated to provide the best racing experience possible. There will be one design and PHRF racing, all participants bring their own boat. Estimated attendance is about 18-20 boats, including 10 Schock Harbor 20s which is more than double the attendance of any other model. South Carolina Yacht Club provides free launching and haulout as well as dockage during the Windmill Harbour Regatta. Spectators will need to contact the yacht club for more information. Some races will have seating and refreshments provided on the pier, while others will have spectator boats available upon arrangements prior to the event.

Domenico De Sole and his lovely wife, Eleanore are hosting this regatta. While many couples sail Harbor 20s together, this couple enjoys a bit of competition as well. Eleanore and Sue sail Harbor 20 #141 Norsewoman with an all-female crew.

But regattas aren’t just about the racing, but have an important social component as well. South Carolina Yacht Club hosts a competitors meeting with the PRO on Friday evening, complete with cocktails and hors d’oeurvres.  Sunday afternoon wraps up with an awards ceremony, featuring cocktails and nachos, also provided by the Club.

 

The social highlight of this regatta is the marvelous dinner party hosted in the De Soles oceanside home on Saturday evening. Previous attendees pick this gala as their favorite part of the weekend. Regatta participants enjoy a sumptuous dinner, a beautiful view of the beach, and have a rare opportunity to view the couple’s private contemporary art collection. The De Soles have been noted for their refined, elegant taste and warm hospitality.

More Events Through the Season

South Carolina Yacht Club will host two more regattas near the end of the season. Carolina Ocean Challenge Regatta is on October 9-11. It also features Harbor 20s with PHRF.

 

The Domenico De Sole Regatta and the Spring Series Wednesday night racing lead up to the famed East-West Regatta on October 23-25. Three skippers and crews will be selected to represent South Carolina, Fleet 3, in the East-West Regatta.  That Regatta is limited to three crews from each Yacht Club: Newport Harbor and Santa Barbara (the West team) and Annapolis and Hilton Head Island (the East team). Last year the East- West Regatta was hosted in Santa Barbara, but this year it will be in beautiful Hilton Head, South Carolina.

 

Come out and join all of the fun in HIlton Head, South Carolina this season. The scenic Windmill Harbour is home to plenty of Harbor 20 activity with racing, regattas, and more. SCYC is  on it’s way to having a big Harbor 20 fleet, and everyone knows what they say about big fleets… big fun! There’s no better way to kick off the season than with a bit of friendly competition, Southern hospitality, and beautiful scenery.

 

Dock and Dine Annapolis Style

 
Dock and Dine Party
Annapolis Style

Annapolis Party
Video: Annapolis Dock & Dine Party

Sailing is fun and enjoyable on its own. However, it’s just more fun to do as a group. Dock and Dine is one group activity that Harbor 20 sailors enjoy.

The Annapolis Yacht Club’s motto is “More than a club, a community” and they really strive to provide their members with the communal experience.

Relaxing Annapolis Style

In Annapolis, Harbor 20 sailors have a history of fun Dock and Dine parties – Chesapeake Style. The Harbor 20s sail over to their host’s house, have a lavish luncheon, dance a little, sing a little, and sail home. What could be a more fitting way to cap a delightful sailing season ?

Harbor 20s fleets each have their own unique way of bonding. The West Coast sailors tend wear Luau shirts or sarongs and cook Tacos. Some Sailors even dance on the beach.

Santa Barbara Beach Party 2014

Every Fleet hosts races, sailing seminars, beach days, or Parties. Each one is unique and has it’s own community style. The East Coast sailors tend towards Polo Shirts and crab cakes, and they  often wear the best headgear.

Annapolis Viking Party 2012

Annapolis Harbor 20 sailors enjoy their parties. The video shows a great Dock and Dine Day Annapolis style

The Fall 2014 luncheon was hosted by Ginny Whitelaw and Mark Kiefaber. They opened their home as the setting for the fleet luncheon since they are conveniently located on the water.

Sue Hitchens Dancing up a Storm

Good food isn’t the only thing this fleet enjoys during this event. Instead of driving, fleet members sail to the event. Everyone meets at the docks of the yacht club. They rig their boats, push off, and set sail. Luckily, the Harbor 20 is fast and easy to rig because these sailors are hungry.

Getting Ready to Sail

The fleet sets sail down the Severn River to Little Round Bay. Open waterways are more fun than highways, and everyone gets to enjoy a lovely afternoon of sailing.

Nice Harbor 20 Breeze

They all meet back at the hosts water-front home. Just like parking, it can sometimes be difficult to find a space, but they find a spot on the dock and go join the merriment.

Harbor 20s Docked & Sailors ready to Dine

There, they all partake in a bountiful barbeque. This gives fleet members a chance to get to know each other better and develop deeper bonds with their fleet-mates.

Fun Sweets

Members bring dishes to share, and everyone gets to enjoy the company and merry-making. Everyone especially enjoyed Sue’s dessert.  Music and dancing round out the day.

Ginny having a good time

This is a light-hearted afternoon that satisfies the fleet’s social needs as well as a learning opportunity. Conversation ranges from life events to sailing tips. It is very important for more experienced sailors to share their knowledge, because the whole community grows and improves together that way. It is a great way to hang out and get some time on the water at the same time.

Good Food, Good Food, Good Friends

After lunch, everyone hops back in their boats and sails together to the yacht club. For Annapolis Harbor 20 sailors, it’s just another day of family, friends, and fun.

On the way Home after a great Dock and Dine !

Harbor 20 sailors participate in many events throughout the year. Annapolis Harbor 20 fleet has races from February to December along with social events.  They also sail during the winter.

Dock and Dine  Newport Style

Harbor 20 sailors love the wind and water. They love sharing good cheer with family and friends. They also enjoy traveling to sail with their fellow Harbor 20 sailors.

Every year, one Harbor 20 fleet hosts the biggest Dock event of the year. There are races and there are parties. Harbor 20 sailors call this event the East – West Regatta. Hilton Head is hosting this year’s East – West. It is bound to be a great long weekend. Harbor 20 sailors are eagerly anticipating another fabulous East-West.

Host of the 2015 East West, South Carolina YC

Look for a local fleet near you or contact a dealer about starting one in your area. The basic fleet requirements are simple, but the rewards are appetizing; much like the Harbor 20 itself.

Harbor20 Season Starts in February

The Most Actively Sailed Boat on Earth

 

Video - Come Fly with Me in South Bay San Diego
Video – Come Fly with Me in South Bay San Diego
February isn’t usually considered the start of sailing season.  Most of North America is covered in snow and ice.
However, those of us at WD Schock noted more than 170 Harbor 20s raced during the first week of February. 

Note, 170 boats racing represents more than 40% of all Harbor 20s ever launched !
Imagine that – nearly 1/2 of all H20 ever built sailing in February.  These Harbor 20s raced all along the Atlantic seaboard from Biscayne Bay to the Chesapeake.  They also raced all along the Pacific Coast from San Diego Bay to Santa Barbara.
Video Spinnaker Hoist Santa Barbara
Video Spinnaker Hoist in Santa Barbara
The first Harbor 20s were commissioned by 5 wise men 17 years ago.  The Sportboat with Cupholders continues its quiet growth with the launch of a record number of  new boats this year.  In the 17 years of building Harbor 20s, there have been hundreds of subtle  innovations incorporated to the new boats.
What always remains the same is the appeal and one design nature of the Harbor 20. The original premise of the Harbor 20 remains vaild today; a simple, safe, stable, and yes; nimble daysailer.
Video - Charlotte Harbor Florida Sailing
Video – Charlotte Harbor Florida Sailing
The Harbor 20 is a record breaking boat. Here is a short list of the national and world records belonging to the Harbor 20:
 
1)  The Harbor 20 is the most actively sailed keelboat in the world. Harbor 20s race more often with more boats sailing  than any other keelboat. 
 
2) Harbor 20s are also the most actively sailed boat at every single club that has a Harbor 20 fleet.  Clubs that have Harbor 20s are  vibrant.  
 
3) The Harbor 20 has the highest percentage of women skippers of any sailboat in the world. Nearly 30% of race skippers of Harbor 20s are women. 
 
4) The Harbor 20 has the biggest Corinthian turnout of any keelboat class champs in the country.  
 
5) The Harbor 20 also has the highest percentage of family teams of any class.  Fully 75% of the teams at the last class champs were families. 
 
The Harbor 20s have big fleets everywhere they sail.
Video - In the Mood for Sailing
Video – In the Mood for Sailing, Newport California
Those Harbor 20 sailors in the higher latitudes will watch these videos with eager anticipation. Their babies might be covered in snow right now, but come Springtime, the Harbor 20s of the North will be relaunched and sailed every chance possible.
Harbor 20 SnowBound in Boston
Sailors are certainly having fun in Harbor 20s. On and off the water, Harbor 20 sailors have fun all year long.  They have great parties, great sailing, and build friendships of a lifetime.
Laughter and good cheer are always the order of the day for Harbor 20 sailors.
If you are interested in joining the fun or want to start a fleet, contact your local WD Schock Harbor dealer or the class organization to get started !

Conquering the Pontchartrain Bump- H20 Demo Day

 

Conquering “The Bump”

New Orleans is notorious for a few things, its parties, its culture, and its bump.
Lake Pontchartrain is known for having very rough choppy waters, known as The Bump.
The Bump is created by powerful Northerly winds with gusts that often reach 20 plus knots.

Harbor 20s are nimble and tough little boats. They have stood up to gale force winds before, they sail in the big ocean swells of the Pacific,  but what about the Bump?

Could the plucky Harbor 20 conquer the infamous Pontchartrain Bump? 

The glamorous Chanel Salzar,
Harbor 20 Sailor
and part owner of Deja Vu

After rigorous testing in the worst conditions that Pontchartrain can dish out, we can confidently state that Harbor 20s can safely navigate the Bump.   

Video: Conquering the Pontchartrain 'Bump'
Video: Conquering the Pontchartrain ‘Bump’

The video shows the Harbor 20s powerful cleaving bow easily slicing through the Bump during a upwind leg. Downwind the Harbor 20 smoothly surfs over the vaunted Bump.

The Harbor 20 easily conquered the Bump !

Photo by Jane Watkins
Harbor Days at Southern YC

Sailors can come to New Orleans and conquer over the weekend on April 4th and 5th. Al Salzar and the WD Schock factory will be hosting a Harbor 20 Demo Day at Southern YC

Al Salzer Welcomes Sailors

Southern Sailors will finally have an opportunity to sail a Harbor 20 on their home waters. The beauty of this boat is that it is so simple and fun, anyone can sail it, regardless of age or sailing experience.

Spinnaker_photo_6

Sailors can learn how simple and nimble to Harbor 20 sailing is. Participants can “conquer the bump” themselves.

Harbor 20 fans at the Southern Yacht Club are forming a one design class fleet in New Orleans. They will be hosting fun and exciting events alongside the demonstration. Everyone who sails a Harbor 20 in the area is welcome to join because as we’ve learned, big fleets mean bigger fun!

The World Famous DejaVu
in the French Quarter

This event has been in the works for several months after seeing the success of Harbor 20 fleets around the country. New Orleans will soon be joining the Harbor 20 Class, and it’s no surprise. Harbor is the most active keelboat fleets on earth and Harbor 20 fleets have revived many a club.

Southern YC front

Come test a Harbor 20 on Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans, April 4&5 starting at 11 AM. We will be at the Southern YC to give you the opportunity to “Conquer the Bump” and enjoy the Harbor 20 experience.

For more information contact Al Salzer SYC (805)886-0099

albertjsalzerm@aol.com

Wood In A New Boat Be Nice?

 

Wood In a New Boat Be Nice?

Kathy had a vintage Harbor 20 boat, hull #14. It didn’t get nearly as much use as she would have liked since she often raced her Lido 14 with Cindy. She loves the physicality of the Lidos, but as time went on, she started realizing that she won’t be able to keep it up forever.
Kathy also has a friend named Pixie, who started raving about the new Harbor 20‘s. Pixie fell in love with the Harbor 20 at the Long Beach boat show. As soon as she sat in it, she thought, “In the future, this is my boat.” The designer shared his vision for a better boating experience, which made her long to sail it even more. She would frequently tell Kathy how amazing the Harbor 20’s are. “That boat is the most comfortable, easy going, fun, picnic, sit back and enjoy life-boat.”

 

Pixie's First Harbor 20 daysail
Pixie’s First Harbor 20 daysail

 

Kathy’s vintage Harbor 20 was starting to need repairs and just didn’t have the features she wanted.

 

 

Walter Johnson reached out to Kathy to inform her about the Schock trade in program. The more features he named, the more the offer “was getting difficult to refuse”. Who wouldn’t love comfy new c-cushions, extra pop-up cleats, and a silky smooth racing bottom? Kathy got an amazing, race-ready H20 boat, hull #359. By trading in her hull #14, she recieved a huge discount. Plus she didn’t have to hassle with fixing up and finding a buyer for her older one.

 

 

She upgraded to the Maderaglass™ that inspired the new boat’s name: Wood In It Be Nice, as coined by her big brother, Ted.

 

“Wood In It Be Nice”

 

Maderaglass™ is a beautiful water-resistant fiberglass finish that creates the look of wood without the expensive maintenance or water damage. They couldn’t be happier with how it looked.

 

 

Taking It Out For a Spin

 

First order of business was a weekend away, sailing from Newport to Long Beach. They sailed approximately 50 miles round trip, and 2 miles out on the open ocean. Why drive when you can sail?

 

 

Kathy and Ted’s parents introduced them to sailing at a young age. It provides a great opportunity for the siblings to keep in touch amidst their busy lives.

 

 

Not to mention that winning it’s far more exciting than coffee.

 

 

Ted, Cindy, and Kathy are a sailing team and have rapidly risen to the top of the B class races. With so much more practice, they are all sharpening their sailing skills. Kathy also takes advantage of the mentorship programs in her Harbor 20 fleet. She often attends the same H20 workshops multiple times and learns something new each time.

 

 

Pixie has also had an opportunity to sail with Kathy in her new boat. While Pixie likes the relaxing aspect of the Harbor 20, she maintains that “a lot of us boating types have this racing spirit.” 

 

 

Kathy and her crew have been racing every chance they get. Their improvement certainly testifies to that competitive spirit. They won the C Fleet Class Championship in 2014, and recently won in the B fleet Winter Series.

With rapid improvement, they are poised to join A fleet soon.

 

For Kathy, sailing is a lifestyle. “Sailing teaches one to be independent and rely on oneself which for me yields the ultimate freedom.” She takes her boat out every chance she gets, spending about 75-100 days a year in her Harbor 20, which is double what she was sailing before. It’s a great opportunity to spend time with family and friends, or make new ones. When the Harbor 20 is so easy to rig, sail, and maintain, she gets to spend more time doing what she loves. It’s no wonder Harbor 20s are  rising in popularity so quickly.

 

 

Interview with Kathy

 

Kathy was interviewed via email on February 23, 2015. The following is in her own words:

Alex told me that you traded in an older H20. What do you do with your old boats?

We still campaign the Lido sailing against some of the best sailors in Southern California.
After six years doing twilights in Long Beach Cindy and I have won the coveted “Pink L” Women’s championship for the past two years.

How did you hear about the trade in program?

Walter Johnson sent us an email and a formal letter. 

 I kept calling and asking Walter if various things were included, the conversations went something like this:

“Now Walt am I going to get the new fabulous closed cell foam cushions? Yes” he replied.  We had the old canvas ones. 

“Will I have a new rig? Everything new? Shrouds, halyards? Everything?, Yes” he said. (since the halyard had just failed I began to wonder what else would fail)

“Okay, what about the bottom? Am I going to get the smooth as silk racing bottom too?” Yes you are, he said.

This was getting difficult to refuse.

“Well, would the boat come with those cool pop up cleats and could the factory put an extra set on the stern for me? I have to attach the Seal Stop equipment and since I’m on the mooring I don’t have enough places to tie the mooring line and the Seal Stop.  Would Schock put extra pop up cleats on too? Let me call Alexander on that one” The answer came back, “Yes, the factory can do it.” 

So we thought for several days with the looming deadline. We called Walt and told him we are going for the trade in program and to get #359 the 15th anniversary addition with the madera glass transom on order for us. 

Everytime we sail #359 Wood in it Be Nice, we are so happy we went for the turn in program.  It’s so nice to have proper equipment to compete with in one design.

It sure was a super deal for us.  There were no surprises or disappointments. 

What motivated you to get a new boat?

The old boat was going toneed a complete upgrade and
Schock gave us a great turn in deal.

How many races have you won in your new boat?

Most recently, we won the Newport Harbor Winter Series regatta for B fleet.  We won the C fleet class championship 2014 and moved up to Bs. We are very happy with the boats performance.

What is the best part about racing your Harbor 20, and in your experience, how does it compare to sailing other boats?

I call it all brain, no brawn.  The Lido is very physical and right now I love the physical part of it.  But, I know one day I will be lucky just to get in the Harbor 20.

Not only is the Harbor 20 a great boat but the fleet is fantastic too. Thank goodness for Peter Haynes! What a treasure for the fleet.  We attended every class he held and I repeated the rules class at least 3 times.  Walter Johnson has also been incredible asset to the fleet with his clinics. I try to attend every one and have learned something new at each one.  The tune ups clinics are terrific too.  The technical support and the social aspect is fantastic!

How often do you sail now compared to before the new H20?

Every race I can.  It’s a lot more fun when one has  equipment that is comparable to the competition.

How long have you been racing as a team with Ted, and has it had any impact on your relationship?

Ted is my big brother and we work pretty well together.  We grew up sailing together and my Dad always made sure my sister and I got as much sailing instruction as my brothers. 

How often do you sail with friends? Has the new boat effected your social life?

All my friends are Lido sailors and now Harbor 20 sailors.  We are super busy with all our sailing friends.  When we’re not sailing we play ukulele and have started a ukulele group at Alamitos Bay Yacht Club.

Has sailing had any impact on other aspects of your life?

Sailing teaches one to be independent and rely on oneself which for me yields the ultimate freedom.  Making the boat go where you want because you understand sailing is an incredible feeling.  
I was lucky my Dad got his family of four kids started at very young ages. I think my Mom appreciated that sailing kept us all out of trouble. We were lucky because both our parents loved sailing too.  

 

 Is the Harbor Series 

Right For You?

 

Harbor 20 fleets are popping up everywhere, and can claim one of the most active keelboat fleets in the world. The winning combination is in the simplicity and speed. Schock’s Harbor series is so versatile, it’s a great fit for everyone, no matter who you are.

 

 

From experienced adventurers

 

 

To little ones

 

 

And even furry ones

 

The water becons to something deep inside all of us. Shock’s true brilliance with the Harbor 20s is in giving so many people access to the ocean and all of it’s wonders.

Kathy and her crew will be able to enjoy sailing in her new Harbor 20 for years to come.

Kids Love Harbor 20s

harbor-20_logo_100

Kids Love Harbor 20’s

Originally Published 10/3/14

david wilson 4

After decades in the boat building industry, one thing has remained true: kids know how to have fun, and they love sailing. What better way to share some quality time with your little ones than to take them sailing on the Harbor 20 for a day of family fun, sunshine, and fresh air?

 

The Harbor 20 allows children to sail confidently as the boat responds well even to the gentlest helm adjustment, and they feel safe and enclosed in the cockpit.

 

david wilson 3

 

It’s easy to single-hand and built tough for commercial usewhile newbie sailors feel at ease by its thoughtfully designed hull that creates a safe and fun environment while learning to sail. It is the Harbor 20’s versatility of a cruiser and performance racer that intrigues sailing schools across the nation.

david wilson 2

Photo courtesy of David Wilson

The Harbor 20 is the boat of choice for the “Guppy Class” at the South Carolina Yacht Club in Hilton Head, SC.

 

david wilson 5

Photo courtesy of David Wilson, SCYC

David Wilson, the SCYC Junior Sailing Program Director says, “The SCYC Guppy Class has produced some of the best sailors. It’s for 6- and 7-year-olds. We only take them out on the Harbor 20 and only when the weather is perfect.”

david wilson

Photo courtesy of David Wilson, SCYC

 

“It is not a baby sitting class; they learn knots, boat part names, and so much more. The Harbor 20 is a great boat to take kids out in because it is safe and stable.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Photo courtesy of Sail Nauticus

 

After many months of research and deliberation, Sail Nauticus Academy selected the Harbor 20 as its primary teaching vessel for all of their sailing activities.

 

Video: Sail Nauticus Academy

 

Based on the Elizabeth River of Norfolk, Virginia, the Sail Nauticus organization offers various sailing instruction programs for middle-school aged children in the area.

Photo courtesy of Sail Nauticus

Photo courtesy of Sail Nauticus

During their summer sailing camps and their flagship after-school sailing program, Sail Nauticus Academy, the children learn about sailing, water safety, and swimming.

 

Video: Sail Nauticus Academy teaches sailing, self-confidence

 

“The point of Sail Nauticus Academy isn’t just to teach kids to sail. It’s about building character and showing them options they otherwise wouldn’t have imagined for themselves,” explains former program director, Bill Bahen (Source: Corinne Reilly, The Virginian Pilot). K.C. Fuller now runs the ever expanding program at Nauticus.

Nauticus_joes job

Video Newscaster Learns how to teach sailing

 

The Harbor 20 is also a member of Castle Harbor Boating School‘s fleet in Coral Gables, FL. Castle Harbor offers courses for both adults and children taught by ASA-certified instructors.

CHBS H20

Photo courtesy of Castle Harbor Boating School

 

 teens ages 10 – 15 learn the basics of sailing, seamanship, and safety. They also learn about local marine ecology.

 

Video: Castle Harbor Boating Campers catch baby Leopard Shark

 

Castle Harbor states that “Self-reliance, teamwork, and analytical thought are just a few of the benefits children take away with them from being introduced to sailing.”

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Photo courtesy of OCC

 

The Orange Coast College School of Sailing & Seamanship in Newport Beach, CA offers youth courses for varying skill levels, and even a class for parents and children to learn together. According to OCC, “sailing requires agility, skill, teamwork, and concentration, and through games, races, and exercises [they] will enhance specific skills including individual and team working skills.”

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Courtesy of OCC

Black Rock Sailing School in Boston, MA uses the Harbor 20 in their introductory and basic keelboat courses, guaranteeing students the “skills, knowledge, and confidence to take command of a boat” on their own.

Photo courtesy of Black Rock Sailing School

Photo courtesy of Black Rock Sailing School

With incredible stability and loads of conveniences, there’s no better opportunity to share sailing excitement with family- whether they’re seasoned sailors or not.

 

From boisterous sea lions to other vessels passing by, exploring the sea is an adventure that will have our kids begging you to take them sailing all the time. Take them sailing in the Harbor 20 and create a family tradition that can be passed on to generations to come. 

Father and Son H20

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Sailing Together

Originally Published January 13, 2015

 

Mayberry RFD

Those of us of a certain age recall the opening sequence of Mayberry RFD. Opie and Andy go fishing together. There is something magic about a Father sharing outdoor activities with his children.  Memories and bonds of those days transcend everything.
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Sailing is one such activity which can be shared and passed down from generation to generation.  Fathers, Children, Grandparents, Moms, and Friends can all participate equally.  
The joy of mastering the mysrteries of wind and water can not be equaled.
The confidence building of skippering one’s own vessel is unmatched for a child.
In this video, we join in a Father and Son Harbor 20 sailing together.  The young man commands the Harbor 20 in a crowded harbor with 40 other Harbor 20s close by.  Magic.
Video: Sailing With Dad

…Sailing introduces a child to “the

 unexpected experience of someone

 taking them seriously…”

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Nick Hayes is his seminal work Saving Sailing Saving Sailing describes how sailing is simply the best activity with which to impart the values of family, teamwork, and self discipline. Nick Hayes describes some of the deeper appeal of the sailing life:
“…This is one of the central lessons of sailing and one of its prime attractions: you just don’t know what you’re going to get. 
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You might not get what you hoped for, for long periods of time. You might have to wait. 
You might have to adjust your expectations. You might have to try again. Most of the essential variables are out of your control. 
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But when it comes together, it can be stunning in its beauty and power: graceful, organic, complete and, dare I say, spiritual.
On one hand, it’s the ideological antonym of the phrase “instant gratification”. These rare memorable moments can’t happen without patience, confidence, trust, hard work and the cooperation of many. They directly oppose the X-Box, cable news, and the all-inclusive theme-park.
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On the other hand, we can also find an ideological link to the time-honored practice of “living in the moment” and rewards not unlike those that might come from centering through prayer or meditation.
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 You find yourself free of distraction and complication and in balance with the world. It’s like you’ve discovered something brand new.

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But there is another notable and very important benefit: you are there with people you love, and they feel the same way.
In our minds, these moments of common joy and circumstance overwrite the trivial, and stand out as the most important in life. These are the formative events.OCC_sail_scholarship_girls2

 

When you hear people sharing these stories, it is clear that they’re talking of the best times, and the best people they’ve known.
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And note something else: they’re not talking about something they purchased with cash or credit. 
Indeed, they’re telling you about something that they made… that they created… that they waited for, and then seized upon by their own volition… by investing time and trying again and again as a team and by trusting….”

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Every Sailor knows the truth of what Nick Hayes has written.

Even the pups are happy

All of us are truely blessed to be able to sail. We are also blessed with how to impart these lessons to the young. What better joy than to have all ages share this blessing together.

 

 

W. Gets a New Boat

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A Brand New Harbor 20

Originally published 2/4/2015

A new sailboat is one of those pleasures we rarely grant ourselves. After all, what is a sailboat but just a extravagant toy?
However, every once in a while we all decide to reward ourselves with something special and seemingly extravagant.
Why ? Because life is short and gosh darn it; we deserve it.
W. sold his boat a few years back. Boatless was not a satisfactory condition for W. Sunshine, wind, and water beckoned.
W. finally decided to get another boat.
W. decided to join the most active keelboat class in the world. He decided to get himself a Harbor 20. He realized the five wise men created the perfect little keelboat. W. liked that he would be sailing a Sportboat with Cupholders

W. decided he would acquire a brand new Harbor 20 rather than a used boat.
Why? Because life is short and gosh darn it; he deserved it.

Video- First Time Sailing His Harbor 20

This video shows the first time W. sailed his beloved new Harbor 20. W. has been sailing his Harbor 20 every chance he can get. His friends and family enjoy going our with him as often as possible.

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Happy Sailors

Life is good!

Even the pups are happy

Even the pups are happy

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